Contours of Copyright: The States Win One and Lose One 

Two recent U.S. Supreme Court cases affect the rights of states under copyright law, one pro-state, one anti-state (really more pro-public). In his new copyright article, Howard Zaharoff discusses the Court's rulings in Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org Inc. and Allen v. Cooper, Governor of North Carolina. The state loss was Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org. Inc. (decided April 27, …

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U.S. Supreme Court Rules EEOC Charge is Procedural Requirement, Not Jurisdictional

By: Amanda Thibodeau As previously discussed on our Employment Law Blog, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”), is a federal statute that prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It also prohibits retaliation against individuals who assert rights under the statute. To assert a …

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Matal v. Tam: The Supreme Court Rejects the Prohibition on Disparaging Trademarks

By: Sean Detweiler and Bianca Sena On Monday June 19, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the U.S. Trademark Office’s denial of registration for “disparaging” trademarks under Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act violates the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment and is therefore unconstitutional. The case, Matal v. Tam (previously known as Lee …

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