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MBBP’s Life Sciences Vector, Fall 2015 11/30/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Client News, Life Sciences, MBBP news, New Resources.
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For many years, non-U.S. parties have taken advantage of the Hague System to register their design patents, an important part of strengthening and differentiating your product and brand. On May 13, 2015, the Hague Agreement Implementation of the Patent Law Treaties Implementation Act of 2012 (PLT) went into effect in the U.S. As a result, the U.S. became a member of the Hague System, an international system of registration for design patents (also referred to as “industrial designs” internationally). Now, U.S. applicants wishing to register a design patent in the U.S. and abroad may submit a single application and pay a single fee to register such design patent in all or some of the 63 other Contracting Parties that participate in the Hague Agreement.

Click here to learn more.


On October 6, the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) issued a binding judgment invalidating the European Commission Decision (Commission Decision 2000/520, the “Safe Harbor Decision”) that authorized the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor arrangement. For the past fifteen years, this arrangement has been relied upon by many businesses to transfer personal data from the European Union to the United States in compliance with the EU Data Protection Directive (Commission Decision 95/46, the “Directive”). As a result of the CJEU’s judgment, self-certification under the Safe Harbor framework is no longer sufficient to comply with the Directive.

Read more on Page 5.


By: Jonathan P. Gertler, Back Bay Life Science Advisors

Business development is the lifeblood of the biotech industry. This article focuses on internal decision making regarding portfolio prioritization, and external anticipatory diligence to maintain optimal control over negotiation dynamics (i.e. “controlling the debate”).

Read more on Page 3.


Registered Patent Attorney Erin E. Bryan handles a broad range of intellectual property issues in a number of technical areas. She currently works with a variety of clients, including universities, research organizations and start-ups in the chemical, pharmaceutical and biotechnology areas. She is also proficient in patent prosecution and provides assistance with various phases of IP litigation and counseling.

Corporate Attorney Erik S. Thompson provides services to a range of clients, including emerging businesses and private investment funds, and advises them on mergers and acquisitions, issuances of ISOs and equity options, and regulatory compliance. He also serves as outside counsel to numerous companies, attending Board meetings and advising them on corporate actions.


In October, Registered Patent Attorneys Sean D. Detweiler and Dr. Stanley F. Chalvire spoke at a program hosted by TechSandBox for its Life Sciences SIG. Joining Sean and Stan were two Life Science CEOs. The panel provided attendees with guidance on how to do a provisional patent, on your own, or on a low budget.


  • NED Biosystems closed a $1.5 million Series B Preferred financing with First Round Capital and angel investors. NED Biosystems provides a adjunct therapy of natural supplements designed to enhance chemotherapy with less toxic side effects.
  • Criscot Inc. closed an $800,000 extension of its Series A-2 Preferred Stock financing. Criscot provides a novel, proprietary applicator for delivery of drug compounds, resulting in more exact dosage without toxicity effects.
  • First Light Biosciences Inc. closed a $3.0 million Series B Preferred Stock financing. First Light Biosciences provides a patented instrument for early and swift detection of pathogens during the hospital admissions process, reducing the risk of hospital-acquired infections.


MBBP client, Selvita, recently announced an expansion into the Boston-area biotechnology and pharmaceutical market, as they open a fully-owned US subsidiary, Selvita Inc., headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Selvita is a leading global drug discovery company and the largest drug discovery company in Central and Eastern Europe. The new office, located at 485 Massachusetts Ave., will focus largely on expanding the company’s existing clients for its drug discovery services, as well as exploring and developing partnering opportunities.

Read more.


Every day, people all over the world use products and solutions produced by Henke-Sass, Wolf – often without even realizing it, as most of our products have the brand and label of our customers and not ours. As a medium-sized international company, and a technological leader in the medical endoscopy sector, we are sometimes considered a “hidden champion” – but certainly not “hidden” from our longstanding business partners and loyal customers.

Read more.

MBBP’s John Hession to Sit as Panelist for Upcoming Launch Smart Clinic 11/25/2015

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M0846571On December 1st, from 5:30 PM – 9:00 PM, MBBP Attorney and Investor John Hession will sit as a panelist for MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge’s Launch Smart Clinic With Agile Sensors And Kalgene Pharmaceuticals.

Pre-funded companies Agile Sensors and KalgenePharmaceuticals are to present their full investor presentation  and will receive feedback from  experts John Hession and  Jeffrey Moore.

The Launch Smart Clinic is an interactive panel and audience participation is encouraged! Learn more and register for the event here.


MBBP Attorney Robert Finkel Judges Case Competition 11/23/2015

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M0846558MBBP Attorney Robert Finkel was one of several judges in TAMID’s First Annual National Case Competition for TAMID at Boston University. TAMID is a comprehensive, multi-phased program that connects students with the Israeli economy. BU TAMID was one of 27 participants in the Competition.

M&A Video Clip – Post-Closing Indemnifications: Common Issues in M&A Transactions 11/23/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Corporate, M&A, New Resources.
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In the ninth video of MBBP’s M&A Clip Series, M&A attorney Mary Beth Kerrigan describes post-closing indemnifications in M&A transactions.

M&A Clips Video #9 - Post-Closing Indemnifications in Purchase Agreements

MBBP Client Halloran Continues to Grow 11/23/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Client News.
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Halloran LogoMBBP Client Halloran Consulting Group, Inc. will be adding 30 employees to its current staff of 57 over the next year. Halloran is known for helping guide life science startups or companies in the midst of transition navigate the waters.

For more on Halloran’s recent growth, read here.

Changes to Canadian Trademark Law 11/17/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, New Resources.
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On June 19, 2014, Bill C-31, Canada’s Economic Action Plan 2014 Act, No. 1, received Royal Assent. The Bill contains a large series of amendments to Canada’s Trade-marks Act and will allow Canada to (among other things) accede to three key international treaties: (1) the Protocol Relating to the Madrid Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Marks (the Madrid Protocol); (2) the Singapore Treaty on the Law of Trademarks (the Singapore Treaty); and (3) the Nice Agreement Concerning the International Classification of Goods and Services for the Purposes of the Registration of Marks (the Nice Agreement).

The new regime is expected to come into force by late 2016 or early 2017. Those already owning or considering registration of a Canadian trademark should be aware of these new changes to Canadian trademark law. Read the full article here.

For more information on trademark matters, please contact Callie Pioli, Thomas Dunn or Sean Detweiler.

M&A Video Clip – Representations & Warranties: Common Issues in M&A Transactions 11/16/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in M&A, New Resources.
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In the eighth video of MBBP’s M&A Clip Series, M&A attorney Mary Beth Kerrigan talks about representations and warranties in M&A transactions.



Happy Birthday Coca-Cola® Bottle! 11/16/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Intellectual Property.
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Coke Bottle100 years ago today, inventor Alexander Samuelson was granted the design patent for the bottle that would come to be known as the iconic Coca-Cola® bottle. The design patent lasted 14 years and then expired, but obviously the design has lived on, and is now considered protected under trade dress laws. The term of design patents filed on or after Dec. 18, 2013 is now 15 years from the date of grant. However, if the ornamental features covered by the design patent are sufficiently distinctive, such as the Coca-Cola® bottle, then over time the design may be protected by common law trade dress, and may even be registered at the Patent and Trademark Office, both of which can provide intellectual property protection for years beyond the design patent term.

For questions about design patents – or to Share a Coke® – please contact Sean D. Detweiler.

M&A Video Clip – Earn-outs: Common Issues in M&A Transactions 11/09/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Attorney News, M&A, New Resources.
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In the seventh video of MBBP’s M&A Clip Series, M&A attorney Joe Marrow discusses earn-outs.


Love Your Lawyer on National Love Your Lawyer Day! 11/06/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Attorney News, MBBP news.
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image001On October 22, the American Bar Association adopted a resolution recognizing the first Friday of November as “National Love Your Lawyer Day,” “a day for the public to celebrate lawyers and express their gratitude to them for their affirmative contributions to the public good and the administration of justice.”

Don’t forget to Love Your Lawyer today! Read the resolution here.

The Contours of Copyright #2: Can You Copyright Yoga Poses? 11/06/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Intellectual Property, Legal Developments, New Resources.
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Attorney Howard ZaharoffBy Howard Zaharoff

Section 102 of the Copyright Act tells us that “choreographic works” – i.e., dances – are protected by copyright. So if you’re Alvin Ailey or Saroj Khan, the copyright police will protect you if someone copies or publicly performs your original choreography.

But what if you’re Beto Perez, who created Zumba; or Arnold Schwarzenegger (governor, actor, bodybuilder), who developed his own workout routines; or Bikram Choudhury (yoga guru and plaintiff), who in 1979 published a book describing his “Sequence,” 26 asanas and two breathing exercises performed for 90 minutes in a room heated to 105 °F? Does copyright protect original workouts or yoga sequences?

Probably not. At least according to the 9th Circuit in the recent case, Bikram’s Yoga College v. Evolation Yoga.

Discussion: Bikram Choudhury, self-proclaimed “Yogi to the stars,” was important in popularizing yoga in the U.S. He claimed he developed his Sequence after many years of research and verification, and he touted its many health and fitness benefits. But when two students who attended his 3-month teacher training started their own studio, offering a “hot yoga” class very similar to his Sequence, he sued for infringement.

The district court ruled that the Sequence was a “collection of facts and ideas” not entitled to copyright protection. Choudhury appealed and the Circuit Court upheld the lower court’s finding.

The Court first reasoned that the Sequence is “an idea, process or system designed to improve health” (Choudhury himself described his Sequence as a “system” or “method” designed to “systematically work every part of the body”). Since Section 102 of the Copyright Act is clear that copyright does not protect any idea, process or system, the Court easily concluded that the Sequence was an unprotectable idea or system. Put differently: “Choudhury thus attempts to secure copyright protection for a healing art,” an obvious no-no.

Nor does the grace and beauty embodied in the Sequence matter, since many processes can be beautiful –a surgeon’s movements, a baker’s kneading – without being copyrightable. In other words, “beauty is not a basis for copyright protection.”

The Court similarly dispensed with Choudhury’s argument that, even if individual yoga poses cannot be copyrighted, the original sequence of poses he developed is copyrightable as a “compilation,” that is, a work formed by “the collection and assembling of preexisting materials.” Not so, said the Court: because Choudhury himself claimed that “the medical and functional considerations at the heart of the Sequence compel the very selection and arrangement of poses and breathing exercises,” the entire Sequence, no less than the individual poses, is itself a process and “therefore ineligible for copyright protection.”

The final – and, as discussed below, least satisfying – part of the Court’s holding is that the Sequence cannot be protected as a “choreographic work.” The Court acknowledged that this term isn’t defined in the Copyright Act (though the legislative history makes clear that the term excludes “social dance steps and simple routines”). But that doesn’t matter, says the Court: “The Sequence is not copyrightable as a choreographic work for the same reason that it is not copyrightable as a compilation: it is an idea, process, or system to which copyright protection” may not extend.

The Court also noted that daily life consists of “many routinized physical movements, from brushing one’s teeth to pushing a lawnmower,” which could be characterized as forms of dance (by whom, the Court does not say). Only the idea/expression dichotomy prevents people from obtaining “monopoly rights over these functional physical sequences.” So at least in the 9thCircuit, arrangements of physical movements with a functional purpose, such as improving one’s health or fitness, no matter how aesthetic or beautiful, are merely unprotectable ideas or processes and therefore cannot be claimed as anyone’s copyright.

An Interlude for Copyright Aficionados: The Court’s final argument – that compilations of physical movements that “serve basic functional purposes” are unprotectable ideas/processes and not protectable choreography – begs the question. It’s cheating for a court to simply declare that a sequence of physical movements that functions as a means to health and fitness is thereby an uncopyrightable process without explaining why other sequenced movements that have similar fitness benefits are copyrightable choreography (which is surely true of the athletic choreographic routines of Alvin Ailey and Pilobulus).

Is it the functional purpose (or effect) of Choudhury’s sequence of poses – i.e., that despite their grace and beauty, they are particularly conducive to fitness – which makes the Sequence an uncopyrightable process? Why? Rarely does the functionality of a work completely deprive it of copyright. Even the designers of “useful articles” can claim copyright in any “pictorial, graphic, or sculptural features that can be identified separately from, and are capable of existing independently of, the utilitarian aspects.” If functionality were a copyright killer, architecture and software would have no protection.

Indeed, why not treat physical movements like architecture and software? Just as copyright law provides no protection for “individual standard features” of architectural works, or for standard routines and features of software applications, can’t we conclude that, although individual poses (or short sequences of poses) that are included in the Sequence and that are unoriginal, standard, or highly effective for fitness cannot be monopolized by copyright, the original overall selection and order of the poses can be deemed sufficiently original and aesthetic to qualify as copyrightable choreography?

In short, nothing in the Court’s opinion explains why the entire 28-step Sequence was ruled an unprotectable idea and no aspect or feature of these graceful movements could be deemed choreographic and copyrightable. This is not to say the Court is wrong. Rather, right or wrong, the Court failed to articulate any principles that distinguish movements constituting “a healing art” from movements constituting athletic dance.

Conclusion: Despite its unfortunate failure to provide a principled distinction between copyrightable choreography and uncopyrightable workouts, it remains undeniable that, in the 9th Circuit at least, there is no copyright protection for sequences of yoga poses intended to improve health and fitness, no matter how graceful or beautiful they may be.

Still, given the gaping hole left by this decision, and the popularity of fitness and yoga, it’s hard to imagine that the issue of copyrightable choreography won’t reappear soon. Or, as Arnold Schwarzenegger (as actor, not bodybuilder) might say: “I’ll be back.”

For more information on this topic, please contact Howard Zaharoff.

MBBP Clients Earn 2015 Beacon Award for Diversity & Inclusion 11/04/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Client News.
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On Thursday, November 19, 2015, the Boston Bar Association will present six Massachusetts Affinity Bar Associations with the 6th Annual Beacon Award for Diversity & Inclusion. Amongst the six award winners are three MBBP Clients, the Asian American Lawyers Association of Massachusetts, the Massachusetts Association of Hispanic Attorneys, and the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. The area affinity bar associations are to be recognized for their exceptional leadership in creating a lasting impact and illuminating a new path toward a more diverse and inclusive legal profession.

Congratulations to the Asian American Lawyers Association of Massachusetts, the Massachusetts Association of Hispanic Attorneys, the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association, the Massachusetts Black Women Attorneys, the Massachusetts LGBTQ Bar Association, and the South Asian Bar Association of Greater Boston!

Massachusetts Data Protection Regulations 11/03/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Internet and E-Commerce, Legal Developments, New Resources, Privacy and Data Security.
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As a reminder, Massachusetts has enacted stringent data protection regulations (the Massachusetts Standards for the Protection of Personal Information of Residents of the Commonwealth, 201 C.M.R. 17.00 et seq. (the “data protection regulations”) and data disposal legislation (Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 93I) (the “disposal law”).

These laws likely apply to your business to the extent that you collect information (either from your own employees or in connection with providing goods/services) that falls within the meaning of “personal information” under the data protection regulations.  Although the definition of “personal information” under the data protection regulations is relatively narrow (a Massachusetts resident’s first name and last name or first initial and last name in combination with any one or more of the following data elements that relate to such resident: (a) Social Security number; (b) driver’s license number or state-issued identification card number; or (c) financial account number, or credit or debit card number, with or without any required security code, access code, personal identification number or password, that would permit access to a resident’s financial account), the data protection regulations impose high minimum standards for protecting such information.  (The definition of “personal information” under the disposal law includes the same information as that in the data protection regulations’ definition, except that the disposal law’s definition also includes a Massachusetts resident’s first name and last name or first initial and last name in combination with a biometric indicator.)

Among other requirements, the data protection regulations require the adoption of a written information security program (WISP) including certain minimum administrative, technical, and physical safeguards – among which are to oversee third-party service providers and adhere to specific computer system security requirements.  The disposal law sets forth minimum standards for the proper disposal of records (including paper documents and non-paper media) containing personal information.

To assist in the compliance process with respect to the data protection regulations, the Massachusetts Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation has created a compliance checklist, as well as a guide for small businesses entitled “A Small Business Guide: Formulating A Comprehensive Written Information Security Program.”

If you would like help in preparing a WISP or addressing other compliance issues, please contact MBBP Attorney Faith Kasparian.

MBBP Attorney Bob Shea Named Chair of SBANE Board of Directors 11/03/2015

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M0846617On October 28, MBBP Partner and Employment Attorney Bob Shea was elected to serve a third year as Chair of the Board of Directors of the Smaller Business Association of New England (SBANE). SBANE is a 600 member non-profit organization that helps New England businesses grow by providing profitable connections, innovation, leadership, advocacy, and education.

Congratulations Bob!

MBBP Attorney Co-Founds The Startup Coalition 11/03/2015

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M0846512MBBP Partner Mike Cavaretta is pleased to announce that he has co-founded The Startup Coalition, a group of seasoned business professionals serving as a resource to the Boston-area startup community, with offices at WeWork South Station in Boston. Members of The Startup Coalition represent a variety of service industries, and collectively cover virtually all of the key services that startup entrepreneurs and companies need.

In addition to Mike, who of course serves as legal counsel to startups, members of The Startup Coalition include Steve Davis of strategic operations, advisory and management firm The CXO Advisory Group; Eric Solem of commercial real estate brokerage Landmark Real Estate Advisors; Chris Donovan of employment benefits and insurance firm Telamon Insurance & Financial Network; Travis Drouin of accounting firm Moody, Famiglietti & Andronico; Dave McLaughlin of startup co-working space WeWork; Pete McDonald of Silicon Valley Bank; Bill Larrenaga of interim CFO service provider The CFO Center Limited; Jennifer Kamerman of content marketing, PR and technology agency MESH Interactive Agency; Steve Schultz of bookkeeping firm Supporting Strategies Partners; and Jim Da Silva of financial advisory firm GW & Wade.

M0846571In addition to the services that individual members of The Startup Coalition provide to startups, The Startup Coalition will offer a variety of programs and events at WeWork South Station in Boston. These will include monthly investor pitch practice sessions, office hours, workshops, panels, and networking events. The first of these events, a panel on Mistakes Entrepreneurs Make When Pitching to Investors, will be held on Wednesday, November 11, 2015, and will feature MBBP Partner John Hession, GrandBanks Capital Partner Tim Wright, and Hub Angels member Charlie Cameron.

Register for the event here.


For more information on The Startup Coalition, please contact Mike Cavaretta.

M&A Video Clip – Working Capital Adjustment: Common Issues in M&A Transactions 11/03/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Attorney News, Corporate, M&A, New Resources.
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In the sixth video of MBBP’s M&A Clip Series, M&A attorney Scott Bleier explains why working capital is a vital piece of the M&A transaction.

M&A Clips Video #6 Common Issues in M&A Transactions- Working Capital Adjustment

Upcoming MBBP M&A Series Event: Selling the Family Business 11/02/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Events, MBBP news.
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The 3rd and final event in MBBP’s 2015 M&A Series will focus on selling the family business.  In addition to the usual transactional concerns including taxes and liability limitation, a sale of the family business often brings a host of issues such as family relations, loss of employment and other aspects that tend to be more “personal” than in other transactions.

On Friday, November 20th, join MBBP and a panel of experienced transactional professionals for a lively, interactive discussion on the unique issues that come up in the sale of the family business and how best to deal with them.

Attendance is free, but seating is limited. To register today, click here.

The Sweetest Trademark Cases of 2015 10/30/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Attorney News, Legal Developments, New Resources.
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By Callie L. Pioli

In 2015 the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (“USPTO”) received hundreds of thousands of trademark applications. While the USPTO did not face a scary number of cases in the candy and sweets industry, the ones that did appear addressed some very creative issues. As we prepare for this year’s Halloween and brace ourselves for the accompanying sugar-highs, we took a moment to trick-or-treat for the sweetest trademark cases of the year.

In re Kabushiki Kaisha Lawson

LawsonThe Japanese mega-brand Lawson filed with the USPTO to extend trademark protection covering its Uchi Café Sweets product line, currently registered in Japan. Lawson is a well-known operator of 便利店, “convenience stores” whose product lines epitomize the trend of cute, or kawaii, designs and objects common in Japanese culture and gaining popularity in the U.S. as well. Unfortunately for Lawson, UCHI had already been registered in the U.S. by Austin, Texas’s Uchi, a Japanese restaurant. Because of the similarity of the goods at hand, the USPTO declared that there is a likelihood of confusion among consumers as to the source of the confections, and accordingly denied registration.

In re Kristin Harris

GlutenIt is estimated that 1 of every 133 Americans suffers from Celiac disease; more still suffer from gluten-intolerance or gluten allergies. A great many delicious treats contain gluten-based sweeteners, such as barley malt, to sweeten the products (pure cocoa is devastatingly bitter.) Further, the tools and machinery used to harvest and process cocoa beans are often the same tools used to harvest and process wheat and other grains, creating cross-contamination issues for those with allergies. In response, entrepreneur KristAnn’s online store caters to those who are afflicted with Celiac disease, and offers shoppers the opportunity to purchase apparel and confections under the CELIABRATE (a combination of “celiac” and “celebrate”) brand. The issue that concerned USPTO was the use requirement. As trademarks are granted based on a mark’s use in commerce, a specimen demonstrating such use has to be submitted to the USPTO office during the registration process. In the specimen demonstrating use, KristAnn combined its mark with other phrases such as “Celiabrate Life,” “Celiabrate Love” and “Celiabrate Bliss.” The Examining Attorney felt that such combinations were inconsistent with the CELIABRATE mark for which KristAnn initially sought protection. Fortunately for KristAnn, the Trademark Trials & Appeals Board (“TTAB”) disagreed with the Examining Attorney based on the mark’s use with the variety of additional terms, as well as the mark’s independent significance. With the TTAB’s reversal of the Examining Attorney’s position, the mark will move on through the registration process and KristAnn may quite soon have another reason to Celiabrate!

In re August Storck KG


Have we gone 2far in our trans4mation of letters in common words? German candy company August Storck seemed to think it could push the boundaries a little farther. August Storck, known primarily in the U.S. for their brand “Werther’s Originals,” sought protection for its latest product in the candy market: “2good”. It is 2bad however that the mark “toogood” is already registered for use by the French distribution company Triumph Snat. The TTAB issued an opinion that, while not visually identical, the two marks were phonetically identical, and as the goods sought to be protected are substantially similar (though connoisseurs of German and French chocolate may disagree), there is a high likelihood of confusion between the two marks. August Storck was just 2 L8 this time.

For the rest of our list, click hereFor more information on trademark matters, please contact Callie Pioli.

Meet the Press with MassBio 10/29/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Events.
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5XXUAkhS_400x400How do journalists choose stories? How can you make your best pitch and get your breakthrough or deals covered? Join MassBio on Thursday, November 12 for its event, “Meet the Press,” to connect with and hear tips from local beat and feature reporters covering the healthcare and life sciences industries in Massachusetts.

Learn more and register for the event here!

MBBP Attorneys Daniele Levy and Scott Connolly Mentor Tech Entrepreneurs at Techstars’ Patriot Boot Camp 10/28/2015

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Attorney News, Events.
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Employment Attorney Scott ConnollyMBBP attorneys Scott Connolly and Daniele Levy recently served as volunteer mentors at Patriot Boot Camp, presented by Techstars, over three days in Detroit, Michigan.  Daniele and Scott mentored a group of more than 50 military veteran technology entrepreneurs, assisted them with developing and improving their business plans and investor pitches, and provided general start-up guidance.  In addition to serving as mentors, Daniele and Scott ran a mini “clinic” to help the participants navigate the corporate and employment law challenges faced by earCorporate Attorney Daniele Ouellette Levyly stage companies.  Techstars is a global ecosystem that empowers entrepreneurs to bring technologies to market and provides seed funding and intensive mentorship.  Patriot Boot Camp was started in partnership with Techstars as part of a broader effort to bring underrepresented populations into technology entrepreneurship.


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