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Washington Redskins Trademark Canceled: What Does This Mean For the Team? 06/18/2014

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Intellectual Property.
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Intellectual Property Attorney Sheri MasonBy: Sheri Mason

The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board issued a decision today cancelling six of the Washington Redskins’ registered trademarks, finding that the marks disparage Native Americans. In 2006, five Native Americans filed a petition to cancel the marks, which were registered between 1967 and 1990, on the grounds that the marks disparage Native Americans. The T.T.A.B. agreed, finding that the marks were disparaging to Native Americans at the time the marks were registered.

If Pro Football, Inc. decides to appeal the decision, the T.T.A.B. will suspend cancellation of the registrations pending a decision by the court, which may take years. If they do not appeal, the registrations will be cancelled at that point.

What does this mean for the Washington Redskins? While the T.T.A.B. has authority to cancel the registrations of the marks, it does not have the authority to issue a ruling concerning the use of the marks. Therefore, even if Pro Football, Inc. does not appeal and the registrations are cancelled, the T.T.A.B.’s decision does not prevent the Pro Football, Inc. from continuing to use the Washington Redskins mark as the name of its professional football team.  This decision also does not mean that third parties may use the marks once the registrations are cancelled; Pro Football has well-established common law rights to the marks and can still prevent third-party use.

The full opinion can be found here.

For more information on trademarks, please feel free to contact Sheri.

Protecting Your Trademark: Top 10 Reasons To Register Your Trademark In The U.S. 06/17/2014

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Trademark Attorney Thomas DunnBy: Tom Dunn

Trademark registration is not required in the United States, however, owning a federal trademark registration enhances rights in a mark.  Here are the top ten reasons why you should register your mark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office:

  1. Prevention:  Registering your mark can prevent potential conflicts from arising. Prospective applicants or their counsel often search the USPTO’s free online trademark registry to determine whether a proposed mark is available. Prospective applicants who encounter your mark might be deterred some from filing a mark that conflicts with yours.
  2. Priority (U.S.): Upon registration, the filing affords you nationwide priority over all others who filed after you, except: (1) parties who used the mark before your filing date; and (2) parties who are entitled to an earlier priority filing date based on a foreign application.
  3. Priority (Foreign):  You have six months from your U.S. filing date within which to file in many foreign jurisdictions and claim as a priority filing date the date of your first-filed application in the U.S. for the same mark for use with the same goods and/or services. For example, if you apply in the U.S. on May 15, you may apply for the same mark for use with the same goods and/or services in China up to November 15 and claim a priority filing date in China of May 15.  Your application in China will take priority over all others who filed in China during those six months.
  4. Presumption:  Once on file, it is presumed your rights extend throughout the United States and its Territories.  Nationwide presumptive rights, as contrasted with geographic limitations inherent in unregistered marks, can be critically important in avoiding confusion in domestic markets in which you currently operate and into which you intend to expand.
  5. Protection:  Registering your mark protects against the registration of a third party’s confusingly similar mark for related goods and/or services by leveraging resources of the USPTO, which is charged with refusing registration of marks that conflict with prior pending and registered marks.
  6. Presentation:  Registration affords you the right to use the ® symbol when displaying your mark. Use of the ® symbol communicates to your current and prospective clients you are serious about protecting your intellectual property rights.  Use of the ® symbol is required at the time an enforcement action arises in order to recover profits and damages in federal court.
  7. Property: Your Certificate of Registration constitutes prima facie evidence of your exclusive ownership of the mark for use with the goods and/or services identified in the registration. After five years of continuous use your property right becomes “incontestable” by operation of law and can no longer be challenged by any third party claiming your mark is likely to cause or is causing confusion with their mark.
  8. Plaintiff:  Federal trademark registration grants you the right to sue for trademark infringement under federal law. Other claims might be available depending on the facts, such as unfair competition, false advertisement, etc., but Section 32 of the Trademark Act, which governs infringement claims, expressly provides for relief to “the registrant” only.
  9. Profits:  When a violation of any right of the registrant of a mark registered in the USPTO is established in a civil action, the registrant may recover certain statutory damages, including defendant’s profits. If you do not register your mark, you cannot recover lost profits.
  10. Ports:  You may record your federal trademark registration with U.S. Customs and Border Protection to block imports that infringe your mark or are counterfeits of your goods.

For more information on trademark registration and other trademark topics, please contact Tom Dunn.

USPTO Proposes Reducing Fees for Trademark Applications and Renewals Filed Electronically 05/20/2014

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Intellectual Property.
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Trademark Attorney Thomas DunnBy: Thomas Dunn

The USPTO has issued a notice of proposed rulemaking relating to the reduction of fees for trademark applications and trademark renewals filed electronically.

Currently the per-class fees for filing an application for registration of a trademark are set at $375 for filing a paper application, $325 for filing electronically using the regular Trademark Electronic Application System (TEAS) form, and $275 for filing electronically using TEAS Plus form, which involves additional requirements. The per-class fee for renewal of a trademark registration is currently $400.

The USPTO proposes to reduce by $50 the fee for an application filed using the regular TEAS application form from $325 to $275 per class if the applicant authorizes email communication and agrees to file all responses and other documents electronically during the prosecution of the application. This option will be known as a TEAS Reduced Fee (‘‘TEAS RF’’) application. The USPTO also proposes to reduce by $50 the fee for a TEAS Plus application for registration from $275 to $225 per class and reduce by $100 the fee for a TEAS application for renewal of a registration from $400 to $300 per class.

The filing fee of $375 per class for trademark applications filed on paper will not be changed. The filing fee of $400 per class for renewal of a trademark registration filed on paper will likewise not be changed.

The full notice is available here. The comment period closes on June 23, 2014. We expect the reduced fee structure will be implemented shortly thereafter.

Trademark attorneys at Morse, Barnes-Brown and Pendleton file every application and renewal electronically, authorize email communication with the USPTO, and file all responses and other documents electronically during the prosecution of an application.  By meeting these requirements, we are positioned to help reduce filing costs for our clients. We invite you to talk with us about how we can meet your trademark needs in a cost-efficient manner.

USPTO Announces Glossary Pilot Program to Expedite Software Patent Applications 03/28/2014

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Computer Software & Hardware, Intellectual Property.
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Patent Attorney Sean DetweilerBy: Sean Detweiler

The USPTO recently announced the launch of a new pilot program called the Glossary Pilot Program, to run from June 2nd until December 31st.  The program is for software patent applications and requires an applicant to include a glossary section in the patent application specification to define terms used in the patent claims. Applications accepted into this pilot program will receive expedited processing and be placed on an examiner’s special docket prior to the first office action, and will have special status up to issuance of a first office action.  More information on the program can be found at USPTO.

If you wish to participate in this program, please contact Sean D. Detweiler.

Changes To Implement the Patent Law Treaty 12/19/2013

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Patent Attorney Stan ChalvireBy: Stanley Chalvire

On Wednesday, December 18, 2013, new U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) final rules addressing the implementation of the Patent Law Treaties Implementation Act of 2012 (PLTIA) took effect, revising the rules of practice pertaining to patent cases.  The final rule was issued on October 21, 2013 pursuant to title II of the PLTIA, which amends U.S. law to implement the provisions of the Patent Law Treaty (PLT). The PLT, an international treaty to which the U.S. is a signatory, aims to harmonize and streamline formal procedures pertaining to the filing and processing of patent applications.

Some of the final rule’s notable changes to U.S. patent law generally pertain to: (i) the restoration of patent rights following the unintentional abandonment of patent applications and the unintentional delay of the payment of certain fees; (ii) the restoration of foreign priority or domestic benefit claims after the expiration of the priority period; and (iii) the extension of the time periods for responding to certain USPTO communications.  A copy of the final rules can be accessed at 78 Fed. Reg. 62368.

For more information or to discuss the PLTIA or how the new rules affect your patents or patent applications, please contact Stan Chalvire.

Andrew Bunin to Panel BPLA Event 04/05/2013

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Attorney News, Events.
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Patent Attorney Andrew BuninOn Wednesday, April 17th MBBP Attorney Andrew Bunin, a former patent examiner, is sitting as a panelist for a Boston Patent Law Association event titled “Communicating with the USPTO – How to (hopefully) obtain favorable results when interacting with examiners and the USPTO“. The event is meant to provide some insight into how the Patent Office operates on a day-to-day basis. Andrew, along with three other panelists, will discuss how changes to laws and the Manual of Patent Examining Procedure (MPEP) affect the patent examiners, office actions, and interviews as well as how this insight can be used to obtain more favorable results when dealing with examiners and the USPTO.

To learn more about this event or to register, please visit the BPLA.

Intellectual Property – The Economic Booster 02/05/2013

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Legal Developments.
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Patent Attorney Andrew BuninBy: Andrew Bunin

Last year the U.S. Commerce Department published a report on the role intellectual property (IP) plays in the economy. The report found that IP-intensive industries support at least 40 million jobs and contribute nearly 35% ($5 trillion) of the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP). It also proved that between 2010 and 2011, direct employment in IP-related industries increased 1.6% faster than the 1% growth in all non-IP industries, and merchandise exports of IP-related industries accounted for 60.7% of total U.S. merchandise exports. Considering these statistics, it comes as no surprise that the current Administration has made an effort to protect IP through the modernization of current patent and trademark systems. Deputy Commerce Secretary Rebecca Blank commented on the necessity of supporting intellectual property today:

Strong intellectual property protections encourage our businesses to pursue the next great idea, which is vital to maintaining America’s competitive edge and driving our overall prosperity. The IP protections we put in place today are helping support economic security for America’s middle class now and in the years to come.

The report titled “Intellectual Property and the US Economy” was prepared by the US Commerce Department’s Economics and Statistics Administration (ESA) and the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Please find the full report here.

To learn more, please visit our Intellectual Property Services page. Feel free to contact Andrew with any questions.

USPTO Publishes Final Rules in the Federal Register Implementing Micro Entity Provisions 12/27/2012

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Patent Attorney Stan ChalvireBy: Stanley Chalvire

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) recently published final rules in the Federal Register implementing the micro entity provisions of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act.

The America Invents Act provided for the creation of a new micro entity status, affording qualifying applicants a seventy-five percent reduction in fees paid to the USPTO. Once the USPTO has completed its fee setting rulemaking, which is currently ongoing and is projected to be complete in the Spring 2013, qualifying applicants claiming micro entity status will be eligible to pay reduced patent fees.

Applicants claiming micro entity status must certify that: (1) they qualify as a small entity; (2) neither the applicant, inventor or a joint inventor on the subject application has been named as an inventor or a joint inventor on more than four previously filed non-provisional patent applications; (3) neither the applicant, inventor or a joint inventor had a gross income exceeding three times the median household income in the calendar year preceding the calendar year in which the applicable fee is being paid; and (4) neither the applicant, inventor or a joint inventor has assigned, granted, or conveyed, nor is under an obligation to assign, grant, or convey, a license or other ownership interest in the application to an entity that had a gross income exceeding three times the median household income in the calendar year preceding the calendar year in which the applicable fee is being paid. Qualifying micro entity applicants also include institutions of higher education (e.g., universities) and inventors that are obligated to assign their rights to their invention to such institutions of higher education.

The final rules set forth the procedures for an applicant to claim micro entity status and to pay reduced patents fees as a micro entity. Additionally, the final rules address procedures for an applicant to notify the USPTO of the loss of micro entity status and to correct payments of patent fees erroneously paid in the micro entity amount. The final rules go into effect on March 19, 2013.

To learn more on this topic, please contact Stan.

International Design Patent Application 12/19/2012

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Patent Attorney Sean DetweilerBy: Sean D. Detweiler

Earlier this month, Congress passed S. 3486: Patent Law Treaties Implementation Act of 2012 (H.R. 6432 was previously passed by the House). The Act, if signed by the President, would allow those in the US to file a single international design patent application for international registration with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (instead of requiring separate filings in multiple countries). The Act would also change the term of a design patent from 14 to 15 years from the date of issuance, and provides for the publication of the international design application (also expanding Provisional Rights to such published application). Design patents cover the “ornamental” features of “articles of manufacture”. The bill may be tracked here.

For more information on this topic, please contact Sean D. Detweiler.

USPTO to Hold a First-Inventor-to-File Roundtable on Thursday, September 6, 2012 08/20/2012

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Patent Attorney David FazzolareBy: David Fazzolare

The USPTO plans to hold a First-Inventor-to-File Roundtable on Thursday, September 6, 2012 from 1:30 to 4:30 pm Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) in the Madison Auditorium at the USPTO’s Alexandria campus. The Roundtable provides an opportunity for the USPTO to gather public feedback over its recently proposed rules and proposed examination guidelines for implementing the first-inventor-to-file provisions of the America Invents Act (AIA).

All are welcome to attend and comment. If you’d like your commentary to be scheduled, however, the USPTO urges you to contact Janet Gongola. The USPTO’s AIA micro-site will also be webcasting the event live.

Written comments regarding the USPTO’s first-inventor-to file proposals can be submitted via email until October 5, 2012. Email comments about the proposed rules to fitf_rules@uspto.gov. Email comments about the proposed examination guidelines to fitf_guidance@uspto.gov.

USPTO Issues Proposed Rules to Implement the Micro Entity Provisions 06/25/2012

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Patent Attorney Stan ChalvireBy: Stan Chalvire

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) recently published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in the Federal Register directed to the implementation of the micro entity provisions of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act.

The America Invents Act provided for the creation of a new micro entity status that affords qualifying applicants a seventy-five percent reduction in fees paid to the USPTO. Qualifying micro entity applicants include, for example, applicants that: (1) qualify as a small entity, (2) are independent inventors having a gross income less than three times the national median household income during the preceding calendar year, (3) had not been named as an inventor on more than four previously-filed non-provisional patent applications (excluding those applications that the inventor was obligated to assign to its employer), and (4) have not assigned and are not obligated to assign rights in their invention to an entity having a gross income in excess of three times the national median household income during the preceding calendar year. Qualifying micro entity applicants also include institutions of higher education (e.g., universities) and inventors that are obligated to assign their rights to their invention to such institutions of higher education.

The proposed rules set forth the procedures pertaining to claiming micro entity status and the payment of patents fees as a micro entity. The proposed rules also set forth the procedures for an applicant to notify the USPTO of the loss of micro entity status and the correction of payments of patent fees that were erroneously paid in the micro entity amount. Micro entity discounts will not be available to applicants until the USPTO proposes to set or adjust patent fees under the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act.

Written comments regarding the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Publication must be received on or before July 30, 2012.

To learn more on this topic, please contact Stan.

USPTO AIA Roadshow Coming to Boston on March 5 02/13/2012

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The America Invents Act was signed into law on September 16, 2011, by President Obama. The Act institutes fundamental changes to U.S. Patent Law, including moving from a first-to-invent to a first-to-file system, instituting a post-grant opposition procedure, and allowing the USPTO to set its own fees, to name just a few.

Under the Act, the USPTO must implement a series of new rules which reflect the agency’s thoughts on how the new patent laws should be implemented. The USPTO has scheduled a series of roadshows across the country to discuss its proposed rules for some of the new AIA provisions, including supplemental examination, inter partes review, and post grant review.

The roadshows run from February 15th in Alexandria,VA to March 9th in Sunnyvale, CA. Visit the USPTO’s website for the entire 2012 AIA Roadshow Schedule. Notably, the great city of Boston will be hosting one of these roadshows on March 5, 2012, at the Boston Public Library. Opening remarks will begin at 10:00 a.m., and the event is expected to last until 4:30 p.m. For additional information regarding the event check out the agenda.

The roadshows are free and open to the general public with no registration required. Members of the MBBP patent group will be in attendance and we hope to bump into you there!

USPTO Announces Public Hearings and Request for Comments 02/01/2012

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Patent Attorney Stan ChalvireBy: Stan Chalvire

In preparation for issuing its report to Congress regarding confirmatory genetic diagnostic testing, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) recently issued a Press Release announcing that it is soliciting information on genetic diagnostic testing.  To assist in its gathering of this information, the USPTO has invited the public to provide written comments and/or testimony at public hearings on February 16, 2012 (9:00 a.m. ET) at the Alexandria, Virginia campus and on March 9, 2012 (9:00 a.m. PT) at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice, University of San Diego in San Diego, California.

Section 27 of the America Invents Act (AIA) mandates the Director of the USPTO to study effective ways of providing independent, confirmatory genetic diagnostic test activity where gene patents and exclusive licensing for primary genetic diagnostic tests exist.  For the purposes of the proposed study, the phrase ‘‘confirming genetic diagnostic test activity’’ refers to the performance of genetic diagnostic testing, by a genetic diagnostic test provider, on an individual solely for the purpose of providing the individual with an independent confirmation of results obtained from another test provider’s prior performance of the test on the individual.

The proposed studies are particularly timely, as the courts continue to consider the patentability of inventions and validity of patents directed to molecular diagnostics.  The proposed studies will examine (1) the impact that independent second opinion testing has on providing medical care to patients; (2) the effect that providing independent second opinion genetic diagnostic testing would have on the existing patent and license holders of an exclusive genetic test; (3) the impact of current practices on testing results and performance; and (4) the role of insurance coverage on the provision of genetic diagnostic tests.

The USPTO’s findings and recommendations must be reported to the Committees on the Judiciary of both the Senate and the House of Representatives by June 16, 2012.  For more information on this topic, visit the USPTO’s website, or contact Stan Chalvire.

Expanded Track I Prioritized Examination of Patent Applications 01/26/2012

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Legal Developments, Life Sciences.
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By: Stan Chalvire

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued final rules (75 Fed. Reg. 78566) extending the prioritized examination (Track I) provisions to patent applications in which a Request for Continued Examination (RCE) has been filed (see, Three Track Patent Examinations: USPTO Provides Further Guidance). The recently issued final rules provide patent applicants with the flexibility to accelerate the processing and examination of their applications in which an RCE has been filed by according such applications special status. An application that is accorded special status is placed on the Examiner’s special docket throughout its entire course of continued prosecution before the Examiner until a final disposition (e.g., the mailing of a notice of allowance or final office action, or the filing of a notice of appeal or subsequent RCE) is reached. The USPTO’s goal for handling applications under prioritized examination is to, on average, provide a final disposition of the application within twelve months of prioritized status being granted.

Requesting prioritized examination after the filing of an RCE requires that:

  1. The RCE be filed in an original utility or plant non-provisional application filed under 35 U.S.C. 111(a) or that has entered the national stage under 35 U.S.C. 371, accompanied by, among other things, a prioritized examination fee of $4,800 (which is subject to a fifty percent small entity discount);
  2. The request for prioritized examination be filed via the USPTO’s electronic filing system (EFS-Web) either concurrently with, or subsequently to, the filing of an RCE;
  3. Upon filing the request for prioritized examination, the application must contain or be amended to contain no more than four independent claims and no more than thirty total claims and no multiple dependent claims and, to the extent that an amendment is filed in an application that has been granted prioritized examination that exceeds these requirements, the prioritized examination will be terminated; and
  4. The request is filed prior to the USPTO’s acceptance of 10,000 requests for Track I prioritized examination under Sec. 1.102(e) in the fiscal year.

The final rules concerning the prioritized examination of applications in which an RCE has been filed became effective on December 19, 2011, and are applicable to any patent application in which an RCE has been filed before, on, or after December 19, 2011. For more information regarding prioritized examination, or to discuss other strategies for expediting the examination of your patent applications, please contact Stan Chalvire.

USPTO Extends Filing Deadlines for Green Technology Pilot Program 12/30/2011

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On December 15th the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) announced it is extending the participation deadline for the Green Technology Pilot Program from December 31st, 2011 to March 30, 2012 or until 3,500 applications have been granted special status. The Green Technology Pilot Program allows for applicants to have their patent filing petitions advanced out of turn for examination, which helps speed the patent process up significantly.

Visit the USPTO for the full press release.

To learn more about the pilot program, please visit today’s Federal Register.

Three at MBBP Named Among Top Patent Prosecutors 07/19/2011

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Attorney News, Client News, MBBP news.
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Patent Attorney Lisa TreannieThree patent attorneys from MBBP have been listed among the Top Patent Prosecutors for 2011 by Patent Buddy, a searchable, networking online database of USPTO-registered patent attorneys and agents, in conjunction with Patent Research Review. They are:

Patent Attorney Sean DetweilerThe Patent Buddy honor recognizes attorneys who have been identified by their peers as producing high quality work specifically in the areas of counseling, application preparation and prosecution of patents.

Out of approximately 30,000 registered patent attorneys, less than 2% were selected as Top Patent Prosecutors. Of those selected to the list, 11% are in-housePatent Attorney Stan Chalvire counsel and 45% have patent registrationnumbers between 30,000 and 45,000.

Congratulations Lisa, Sean and Stan!

Getting on the Fast Track at the PTO 04/12/2011

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Patent Attorney Lisa TreannieBy: Lisa Treannie

Beginning May 4th, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will begin offering fast-track examination of patent applications for the bargain price of $4000 (in addition to the normal PTO fees). For each of the up-to-10,000 applications accepted into the program, the PTO pledges to handle the application within a year, which is about a third of the current processing time. This program is Track 1 of three tracks to be offered by the PTO to allow applicants to have more control over the speed of examination of their applications. Track 2 is the normal examination track, and Track 3 (delayed examination) is expected to be implemented by the end of September.

Please click here for more details on Track 1.

For details on the three-track initiative, click here.

USPTO Provides Further Guidance on Proposed Three Track Examination Initiative 02/14/2011

Posted by Morse, Barnes-Brown Pendleton in Attorney News, Legal Developments.
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By Daniel McGeeney and Stan Chalvire

In a Press Release issued on February 2, 2011, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) announced updates to its proposed “Three Track” examination initiative. This initiative was proposed by the USPTO in June 2010 (75 Fed. Reg. 31763) to provide applicants some control over the timing of the examination of their patent applications. The proposed initiative aims to provide applicants with the type of examination they need and to reduce the overall pendency of patent applications, which presently stands at almost three years.

Patent Attorney Stan ChalvireGenerally, the proposed Three Track examination initiative would allow applicants to: (1) request prioritized examination of a non-continuing application within twelve months of their filing date (Track I); (2) request that an application that does not claim the benefit of a prior-filed foreign application or a prior non-provisional application be placed in an applicant-controlled up to 30 month queue prior to docketing for examination (Track III); or (3) make neither of the Track I or Track III requests and proceed in accordance with the current standard procedure (Track II).

For the full article on this subject, please visit our website.

For more information or to discuss the USPTO’s proposed Three Track examination initiative, as well as other strategies for expediting the examination of your patent application, please contact Daniel McGeeney or Stan Chalvire.

USPTO Extends Temporary Program Aimed at Reducing the Backlog of Unexamined Patent Applications 03/05/2010

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Patent Attorney Stan ChalvireBy: Stan Chalvire

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) recently extended its temporary initiative aimed at reducing the backlog of unexamined patent applications. The Patent Application Backlog Reduction Stimulus Plan, which was originally scheduled to remain in effect until February 28, 2010, has now been extended until June 30, 2010.

As previously announced, the USPTO’s initiative provides small entity applicants (generally individual inventors, non-profit corporations or business entities having less than 500 employees) an opportunity to have their unexamined patent applications accorded special status and examined out of turn. To be accorded special status, however, the small entity applicant must expressly abandon another unexamined patent application that is pending at the same time. Both the patent application for which special status is sought and the expressly abandoned patent application must either be owned by the same party or name at least one common inventor, and have been filed prior to October 1, 2009.

Small entity applicants with multiple unexamined patent applications pending before the USPTO should consider whether the USPTO’s temporary initiative would provide them with meaningful strategic advantages and whether such advantages outweigh the relative risks of expressly abandoning a co-pending application.

For more information on patent applications, please contact Stan Chalvire.

New Resource for Inventors 03/05/2010

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Patent Attorney Lisa TreannieBy: Lisa Treannie

The United States Patent and Trademark Office has launched a new electronic publication called “Inventors Eye” targeted to the independent and small entity inventor community. Inventors Eye will be published every other month and will feature tips on working with the USPTO; events, organizations and meetings of interest to the community; issues that impact independent and small entity inventors; and stories about people who have become successful inventors. If the first issue  is representative, the content is interesting, helpful and to the point, and answers many of the questions patent attorneys are asked by independent inventors during their first meeting.

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